Westword July 26, 2012 : Page 44

westword.com rough mixes Red Letter Days B its second EP, Painter’s Picture . We recently sat down with Eas-tin and talked about the move to Denver and the encouragement Tango Red has received in both of its homes. great music scene; so has the Springs. There’s a lot more audience here. There are a lot more places to play, so it was a natural move. I spent most of my life in the Springs. When you hit a certain age, you want some sense of adventure, and that played into the decision as well. When we were [in the Springs], our friends in bands we played with always offered encouragement and support any way they could. You’re go-ing to run into people who are very focused on themselves, but that place had a lot of en-couragement. We’ve been fortunate to run into a lot of people in Denver who have wanted to help us out because they know we’re fairly new, so they give us pointers. The Photo Atlas has helped us, and [so has] Peña. Still City did, too, as did Soda Jerk. I guess if you put enough work and sincerity into it, people are going to help you out. — T OM M URPHY CHARLIE SMITH LETTERS MOVIES | NIGHT+DAY | OFF LIMITS | ¡ASK A MEXICAN! | | CONTENTS | rian Eastin, singer and guitarist for Tango Westword: When you were Red Tapestry, met drummer Nicholas Hureau when they were both five and their starting out in Colorado Springs, parents were musicians in the Army — but the a lot of the more active bands two never really played music together as kids. that were the core of the under-In high school, Eastin met bassist Dan Snyder ground scene there had broken up or were about to. and the two formed a band, What was it like playing shows inspired by acts Tango Red Tapestry there for you at like Against Tomorrow’s Sky, With At Tide We Sail that time? the Great Redneck Hope and and the Pillowfighter, Brian Eastin: Eyes Caught Fire — all great 8 p.m. Friday, July We knew some Colorado Springs bands from 26, hi-dive, 7 S. people from our Wonder what Tango Red Tapestry’s favorite color is. the past decade. Broadway, $6, 720-time in our first When the members of the 570-4500. band and told them we had cently with Nicholas and our other guitarist, fledgling outfit parted ways in something new going on, and Jesse Cotton Stone. We released an EP and 2008, Eastin and Snyder got together again and formed Tango Red Tapes-they were supportive — Eyes Caught Fire it was well received, but we always wanted try. After two years of figuring out the proper being one of them. Then we started playing to do more. Why did you move to Denver? chemistry and lineup, which now includes the venues there, and we were still stuck in We didn’t [want] to go to a completely guitarist Jesse Cotton Stone and Hureau, and the mode of not thinking we had the right a move to Denver in 2011, the band is issuing combination for the band. That changed re-unknown place. Denver has always had a | I AM TRYING TO BREAK YOUR HEART Everyone knows the story of Charles Darwin, best remem-bered as the guy who espoused evolution. The most important thing we learned from him is that all things, over the course of time, must change. For example, just as the dinosaurs evolved into the species we know today as That One Shark That Was in Jaws , so American Idol has evolved from A Show Where People Go to Become Famous into A Show Where Already Famous People Go to Die. In the beginning, American Idol created Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, and American Idol saw Kelly Clarkson and Car-rie Underwood, and they were pretty good. In the seventh season, American Idol rested, which pretty much went on for the next three B Y JEF seasons until both Paula Abdul and Simon Cowell left and it looked like American Idol was just about dead. Two thirds of the original judges were gone, leaving only sad old Randy Jackson, the judge everybody least cared about in the first place; the show hadn’t crowned WESTWORD a relevant winner in six years; and there were more important shows to watch, such as the hilarious CBS comedy $h*! My Dad Says , which, sadly, was canceled mid-season. In the meantime, American Idol found its saving grace, and it came in the form of Jennifer Lopez and Steven Tyler, the latter of whom was both terrible and wondrous to watch, if only by virtue of the fact that he came on to, like, every chick the show put in front of him. And now, after just one season, both J. Lo and Ste-Ty (just coined that one now) are leaving the show. And that’s perfectly okay. Idol is evolving quickly these days — for the past several years, the show has seen judge shake-ups every season — but all that indicates is a deeper, more important evolution at play: O TTE Idol is no longer about the contestants, but about the judges. Specifically, it’s about watch-ing washed-up famous people give terrible advice to young people who don’t know any better. And if those washed-up famous people mistakenly believe — as J. Lo evidently does — that the swan song of American Idol is somehow going to rekindle their washed-up careers, that’s fantastic, because it keeps more washed-up celebrities coming. Witness: Next year’s potential batch is, like, whoa . Charlie Sheen? Aretha Franklin? Adam Lambert ? JK, who gives a shit about Adam Lambert — but Mariah Carey? Charlie Sheen? Aretha Franklin? Who will possibly bring on Pattly LaBelle as a sidekick? Even before her judgeship was the whisper of a rumor, Aretha proved she’d be awesome at the job when she got all O NO YOU DINT at Kathie Lee Gifford after Gifford suggested last week that she might be too old for it. “I am very well known to young adults, tweens and teens,” Franklin retorted, possibly echoed by ten backup singers. “Their parents play my music, and I take care of my business whenever I sign on the dotted line.” Propers! Also, as Ste-Ty proves, Idol is going to need at least one borderline-psychotic weird old lecher in a judgeship moving forward. So, basically, it’s perfect. Adam Lambert, GTFO. E-mail jef.otte@westword.com. 44 J ULY 26-A UGUST 1, 2012 | BACKBEAT | CAFE | ART | THEATER

Rough Mixes

Jef Otte

Red Letter Days<br /> <br /> Brian Eastin, singer and guitarist for Tango Red Tapestry, met drummer Nicholas Hureau when they were both five and their parents were musicians in the Army — but the two never really played music together as kids. In high school, Eastin met bassist Dan Snyder and the two formed a band, playing shows inspired by acts like Against Tomorrow’s Sky, the Great Redneck Hope and Eyes Caught Fire — all great Colorado Springs bands from the past decade.<br /> <br /> When the members of the fledgling outfit parted ways in 2008, Eastin and Snyder got together again and formed Tango Red Tapestry. After two years of figuring out the proper chemistry and lineup, which now includes guitarist Jesse Cotton Stone and Hureau, and a move to Denver in 2011, the band is issuing its second EP, Painter’s Picture. We recently sat down with Eastin and talked about the move to Denver and the encouragement Tango Red has received in both of its homes.<br /> <br /> Westword: When you were starting out in Colorado Springs, a lot of the more active bands that were the core of the underground scene there had broken up or were about to. What was it like there for you at that time?<br /> <br /> Brian Eastin: We knew some people from our time in our first band and told them we had something new going on, and they were supportive — Eyes Caught Fire being one of them. Then we started playing the venues there, and we were still stuck in the mode of not thinking we had the right combination for the band. That changed recently with Nicholas and our other guitarist, Jesse Cotton Stone. We released an EP and it was well received, but we always wanted to do more.<br /> <br /> Why did you move to Denver?<br /> <br /> We didn’t [want] to go to a completely unknown place. Denver has always had a great music scene; so has the Springs. There’s a lot more audience here. There are a lot more places to play, so it was a natural move. I spent most of my life in the Springs. When you hit a certain age, you want some sense of adventure, and that played into the decision as well.<br /> <br /> When we were [in the Springs], our friends in bands we played with always offered encouragement and support any way they could. You’re going to run into people who are very focused on themselves, but that place had a lot of encouragement.<br /> <br /> We’ve been fortunate to run into a lot of people in Denver who have wanted to help us out because they know we’re fairly new, so they give us pointers. The Photo Atlas has helped us, and [so has] Peña. Still City did, too, as did Soda Jerk. I guess if you put enough work and sincerity into it, people are going to help you out. <br /> <br /> — TOM MURPHY<br /> <br /> I AM TRYING TO BREAK YOUR HEART<br /> <br /> BY JEF OTTE<br /> <br /> Everyone knows the story of Charles Darwin, best remembered as the guy who espoused evolution. The most important thing we learned from him is that all things, over the course of time, must change. For example, just as the dinosaurs evolved into the species we know today as That One Shark That Was in Jaws, so American Idol has evolved from A Show Where People Go to Become Famous into A Show Where Already Famous People Go to Die.<br /> <br /> In the beginning, American Idol created Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, and American Idol saw Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, and they were pretty good. In the seventh season, American Idol rested, which pretty much went on for the next three seasons until both Paula Abdul and Simon Cowell left and it looked like American Idol was just about dead. Two thirds of the original judges were gone, leaving only sad old Randy Jackson, the judge everybody least cared about in the first place; the show hadn’t crowned a relevant winner in six years; and there were more important shows to watch, such as the hilarious CBS comedy $h*! My Dad Says, which, sadly, was canceled mid-season. In the meantime, American Idol found its saving grace, and it came in the form of Jennifer Lopez and Steven Tyler, the latter of whom was both terrible and wondrous to watch, if only by virtue of the fact that he came on to, like, every chick the show put in front of him. And now, after just one season, both J. Lo and Ste-Ty (just coined that one now) are leaving the show. And that’s perfectly okay.<br /> <br /> Idol is evolving quickly these days — for the past several years, the show has seen judge shake-ups every season — but all that indicates is a deeper, more important evolution at play: Idol is no longer about the contestants, but about the judges. Specifically, it’s about watching washed-up famous people give terrible advice to young people who don’t know any better. And if those washed-up famous people mistakenly believe — as J. Lo evidently does That the swan song of American Idol is somehow going to rekindle their washed-up careers, that’s fantastic, because it keeps more washed-up celebrities coming.<br /> <br /> Witness: Next year’s potential batch is, like, whoa. Charlie Sheen? Aretha Franklin? Adam Lambert? JK, who gives a shit about Adam Lambert — but Mariah Carey? Charlie Sheen? Aretha Franklin? Who will possibly bring on Pattly LaBelle as a sidekick? Even before her judgeship was the whisper of a rumor, Aretha proved she’d be awesome at the job when she got all O NO YOU DINT at Kathie Lee Gifford after Gifford suggested last week that she might be too old for it.<br /> <br /> “I am very well known to young adults, tweens and teens,” Franklin retorted, possibly echoed by ten backup singers. “Their parents play my music, and I take care of my business whenever I sign on the dotted line.” Propers! Also, as Ste-Ty proves, Idol is going to need at least one borderline-psychotic weird old lecher in a judgeship moving forward. So, basically, it’s perfect.<br /> <br /> Adam Lambert, GTFO.<br /> <br /> E-mail jef.otte@westword.com

4 Questions

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here